• 7
    Green Synthetic Methanol & Methanol as an infrastructure adaptor for Hydrogen
    4 weeks agoopen0
    The demand for petrochemicals is constantly increasing, and the demand for chemical fuels will continue to grow as long as businesses, economies and nations develop and grow. Fossil fuel prices are increasing, becoming more volatile, more unreliable, more socially unacceptable and causing increased political tensions. Even with continuing electrification, we will still depend heavily on chemical vectors (batteries, e-fuels, e-petrochemicals/petro-products). Given fossil fuels will have to be phased out, what is the drop-in replacement solution for fossil fuels? Can we overcome the issues and resultant failure of hydrogen adoption, while maintaining the advantages? Synthetic methanol, is a simple, liquid, infrastructure compatible, bio-compatible, energy dense vector for Hydrogen and is an elegant solution to this problem. Hydrogen created from renewable electrical energy sources, chemically compressed into methanol, becomes a drop-in replacement everywhere in the current fossil fuel infrastructure. Methanol can also be converted back into Hydrogen simply and safely just before the point of use, for example between a fuel tank and a fuel cell, turbine-boiler or furnace. Synthetic methanol thus can function as both an electrical storage medium, hydrogen storage medium and heat energy storage medium. Furthermore, methanol is a carbon sink and is one of the few energy vector candidates that removes CO2 from the environment. Synthetic methanol can also be converted to other hydrocarbons including gasoline and kerosene (jet) fuels, allowing a pivot to a phased introduction of carbon-neutral (or better) fuels.
  • 4
    Fast Fashion to Innovative Insulation
    4 weeks agoopen0
    Very short summary: Digest clothing/waste fabrics (cellulose fibres) to simple sugars using an industrial process (I know someone who's just done a PhD on this, but he's spinning the fibres back into new cloth). Use this as a feedstock for efficient mycellium growth. Grow sustainable packaging and/or building materias. Not sure if the carbon footprint/economics of it work out didn't get that far but the process seems like it may be feasible.